Finding Home, Part 2 of 4

A Lenten Meditation on Luke 15:1-3, 11b-32

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Jesus told the Parable of the Prodigal Son in response to the religious authorities who were scandalized that he welcomed and befriended sinners. Those who were considered ritually impure and ethically immoral.

Through this parable, Jesus proclaimed the purpose of his ministry: To seek and serve those who society and institutional structures considered to be the least, the last, and the lost.

In this light, this story is a declaration of redemption, a word of welcome home. If so, then how does this happen?

I can interpret this story – given the details that the son “came to himself” (remembered what he had), his confession, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and you” (defying your will), his contrition, “I am not worthy to be called your son” (you have a moral right to disown me), and his petition, “Treat me like a servant” – as descriptive of a process of conformity to a code of conduct external to one’s self. Finding one’s way home, then, involves the repentance of submission to the will of another.

I can make this case; especially when “the Another” is God. Nevertheless, I also believe that this ongoing, repeatable process of redemption, of finding one’s way home involves coming face to face with one’s self.

© 2022 PRA

#homeiswheretheheartis #homeiswheretheselfis #lookingforhome #beingandbecoming

5 thoughts on “Finding Home, Part 2 of 4

  1. I like the “Nevertheless….” and the idea of coming face to face with oneself as the means of coming home. I look forward to your further discussion of the distinction between the emphases on the prodigal’s relationship to the father and his relationship to himself as means of redemption.

    Love,

    Karen

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  2. Thank you, dear Karen. In this — as in past cases of dreaming my way into and drafting meditations/reflections of more than one part — I continue to think about the subject between parts and, perhaps, revise what I initially had discerned to be the direction I was/am going (was/am being led). One thing is clear to me (I think!). As this is a Lenten exploration, I am given to ponder my inner-work of spiritual growth. Thus, the “home” is less (if at all) a physical outer place and more a metaphysical inner space. Let’s see where I/we go — and, no, not end, for the work continues as long as there is breath and life!

    Love

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  3. As I heard somewhere once (or maybe twice!), “Carry on!” 😊

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  4. YES!!! As Karen says and you often say Paul, Carry On!!!

    For me, home is definitely an inner space…. I gave up the top floor of my home because it wasn’t home without Tim… I’m so content in my new place because it’s just mine. When I look at myself in the mirror I feel that I’m home – in my space and in myself…I still do need to work on redemption in terms of some of my relationships and then maybe I could say I’m totally at home!!

    Love you both!

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    1. Thank you! I will carry on!

      And, my dearest Loretta, I only can imagine what your inner processes of discernment have been and are regarding your decision to move from your first floor “because it wasn’t home without Tim.” Aye, Tim was…is a life-force. Thus, without his physical presence that space which he so fully filled during his living wouldn’t…couldn’t be the same ever again for you.

      In all of this, it overjoys my heart to read and to know that you are “so content in my new place because it’s just mine. When I look at myself in the mirror I feel that I’m home – in my space and in myself…” I treasure this reality for you. I also reflect on that countless numbers of folk whose life-stories I have been privileged to hear o’er the years who were not able to articulate this blessedness of which you write of being at home with themselves. (Truth be told — and I know that you know this about me — I have struggled and, at times, struggle still to find a peaceful dwelling within myself).

      Love,
      Paul

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